Monday, October 14, 2019

Wikipedia's Article of the Day October 15, 2019: Al-Mu'tadid


Al-Mu'tadid (c. 857 – 5 April 902) was the Abbasid Caliph from 15 October 892 until his death.

As a prince, he served under his father al-Muwaffaq during various military campaigns and helped suppress the Zanj Rebellion. As caliph, he restored to the Abbasid state some of the power it had lost during the turmoils of the previous decades.

In a series of campaigns he recovered the provinces of Jazira, Thughur and Jibal, and effected a rapprochement with the Saffarids in the east and the Tulunids in the west. He brought the capital back to Baghdad, where he engaged in major building projects.

He was a firm supporter of Sunni traditionalist orthodoxy, and notorious for his fiscal stringency and cruel punishments, but also interested in the learning and science that had flourished under his predecessors, promoting men like Thabit ibn Qurra, a mathematician and translator of Greek texts.

His reign marks the last revival of the Abbasid empire before its terminal decline during the 10th century.

Conjoined Twin Sisters Tell Their Story: ‘Being By Her … It’s So Calming' | Megyn Kelly TODAY



Conjoined Twin Sisters Tell Their Story: ‘Being By Her … It’s So Calming' | Megyn Kelly TODAY

Emily and James Stark gave birth to conjoined twins Lexi and Sydney Stark on March 9, 2001. The family joins Megyn Kelly TODAY with the story of the twins’ risky separation surgery, as well as their lives now. The girls talk how they still nap in what they call the “conjoined twin position,” and call being near each other “calming.” » Subscribe to TODAY: http://on.today.com/SubscribeToTODAY » Watch the latest from TODAY: http://bit.ly/LatestTODAY About: TODAY brings you the latest headlines and expert tips on money, health and parenting. We wake up every morning to give you and your family all you need to start your day. If it matters to you, it matters to us. We are in the people business. Subscribe to our channel for exclusive TODAY archival footage & our original web series. Connect with TODAY Online! Visit TODAY's Website: http://on.today.com/ReadTODAY Find TODAY on Facebook: http://on.today.com/LikeTODAY Follow TODAY on Twitter: http://on.today.com/FollowTODAY Follow TODAY on Google+: http://on.today.com/PlusTODAY Follow TODAY on Instagram: http://on.today.com/InstaTODAY Follow TODAY on Pinterest: http://on.today.com/PinTODAY Conjoined Twin Sisters Tell Their Story: ‘Being By Her … It’s So Calming' | Megyn Kelly TODAY

Trump orders Turkey sanctions; US scrambles for Syria exit (VIDEO)

In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrian troops deploy in the northern town of Tal Tamr, Monday, Oct 14, 2019. The move toward Tal Tamr came a day after Syria's Kurds said Syrian government forces agreed to help them fend off Turkey's invasion — a major shift in alliances that came after President Donald Trump ordered all U.S. troops withdrawn from the northern border area amid the rapidly deepening chaos. (SANA via AP)
WASHINGTON (Associated Press) — Targeting Turkey’s economy, President Donald Trump announced sanctions Monday aimed at restraining the Turks’ assault against Kurdish fighters and civilians in Syria -- an assault Turkey began after Trump announced he was moving U.S. troops out of the way.

Meanwhile, the Americans were scrambling for Syria’s exits, a move criticized at home and abroad as opening the door to a resurgence of the Islamic State group whose violent takeover of Syrian and Iraq lands five years ago was the reason American forces came in the first place.

Trump said the approximately 1,000 U.S. troops who had been partnering with local Kurdish fighters to battle IS in northern Syria are leaving the country. They will remain in the Middle East, he said, to “monitor the situation” and to prevent a revival of IS -- a goal that even Trump’s allies say has become much harder as a result of the U.S. pullout.

The Turks began attacks in Syria last week against the Syrian Kurdish fighters, whom the Turks see as terrorists. On Monday, Syrian government troops moved north toward the border region, setting up a potential clash with Turkish-led forces.

Trump said Turkey’s invasion is “precipitating a humanitarian crisis and setting conditions for possible war crimes,” a reference to reports of Turkish-backed fighters executing Kurdish fighters on the battlefield.

The Kurdish forces previously allied with the U.S. said they had reached a deal with President Bashar Assad’s government to help them fend off Turkey’s invasion, a move that brings Russian forces deeper into the conflict.

In his sanctions announcement, Trump said he was halting trade negotiations with Turkey and raising steel tariffs. He said he would soon sign an order permitting sanctions to be imposed on current and former Turkish officials.

“I am fully prepared to swiftly destroy Turkey’s economy if Turkish leaders continue down this dangerous and destructive path,” Trump said.

American troops consolidated their positions in northern Syria on Monday and prepared to evacuate equipment in advance of a full withdrawal , a U.S. defense official said.

The official, who was not authorized to be quoted by name, said U.S. officials were weighing options for a potential future counter-IS campaign, including the possibility of waging it with a combination of air power and special operations forces based outside of Syria, perhaps in Iraq.

The hurried preparations for a U.S. exit were triggered by Trump’s decision Saturday to expand a limited troop pullout into a complete withdrawal.

Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday he would travel to NATO headquarters in Brussels next week to urge European allies to impose “diplomatic and economic measures” against Turkey -- a fellow NATO ally -- for what Esper called Ankara’s “egregious” actions.

Esper said Turkey’s incursion had created unacceptable risk to U.S. forces in northern Syria and “we also are at risk of being engulfed in a broader conflict.”

The only exception to the U.S. withdrawal from Syria is a group of perhaps 200 troops who will remain at a base called Tanf in southern Syria near the Jordanian border along the strategically important Baghdad-to-Damascus highway. Those troops work with Syrian opposition forces unrelated to the Kurdish-led fighters in northern Syria.

Esper said the U.S. withdrawal would be done carefully to protect the troops and to ensure that no U.S. equipment was left behind. He declined to say how long that might take.

In a series of tweets Monday, Trump defended his gamble that pulling U.S. forces out of Syria would not weaken U.S. security and credibility. He took sarcastic swipes at critics who say his Syria withdrawal amounts to a betrayal of the Kurds and plays into the hands of Russia.

“Anyone who wants to assist Syria in protecting the Kurds is good with me, whether it is Russia, China, or Napoleon Bonaparte,” he wrote. “I hope they all do great, we are 7,000 miles away!”

Trump has dug in on his decision to pull out the troops, believing it fulfills a key campaign promise and will be a winning issue in the 2020 election, according to White House officials.

This has effectively ended a five-year effort to partner with Syrian Kurdish and Arab fighters to ensure a lasting defeat of the Islamic State group. Hundreds of IS supporters escaped a holding camp amid clashes between invading Turkish-led forces and Kurdish fighters, and analysts said an IS resurgence seemed more likely, just months after Trump declared the extremists defeated.

Republican Senate leader Mitch McConnell, normally a staunch Trump supporter, said he was “gravely concerned” by events in Syria and Trump’s response so far.

Withdrawing U.S. forces from Syria “would re-create the very conditions that we have worked hard to destroy and invite the resurgence of ISIS,” he said in a statement. “And such a withdrawal would also create a broader power vacuum in Syria that will be exploited by Iran and Russia, a catastrophic outcome for the United States’ strategic interests.”

However, Trump got quick support from Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who had lambasted his withdrawal decision last week as “shortsighted,” ″irresponsible” and “unnerving to its core.” On Monday, echoing Trump, Graham said on Fox News Channel that the current situation was Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s fault and Turkey would face “crippling sanctions” from the U.S. on its economy.

The Kurds have turned to the Syrian government and Russia for military assistance, further complicating the battlefield.


The prospect of enhancing the Syrian government’s position on the battlefield and inviting Russia to get more directly involved is seen by Trump’s critics as a major mistake. But he tweeted that it shouldn’t matter.

“Others may want to come in and fight for one side or the other,” he wrote. “Let them!”

New Jersey Sen. Bob Menendez, the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said Trump is weakening America. ’To be clear, this administration’s chaotic and haphazard approach to policy by tweet is endangering the lives of U.S. troops and civilians,” Menendez said in a statement.

NTVUganda has added What is East Africa's crude PipeLine? video

What is East Africa's crude PipeLine?



#NTVNews Subscribe to Our Channel For more news visit http://www.ntv.co.ug Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/ntvuganda Like our Facebook page https://ift.tt/1bbEIWm

NTVUganda has added Refugees accused of illegally acquiring sim-cards video

Refugees accused of illegally acquiring sim-cards



The Uganda Communication Commission says it will switch off all SIM cards illegally registered using refugee Identity Cards. UCC recently revealed that there is a racket especially in Kampala, where fake refugee IDs are issued for people who do not want to register SIM cards using their real identity. SOLOMON KAWEESA also talked to the Office of the Prime Minister which is responsible for the refugees. #NTVNews Subscribe to Our Channel For more news visit http://www.ntv.co.ug Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/ntvuganda Like our Facebook page https://ift.tt/1bbEIWm

Tunisia presidential election: Kais Saied declared winner



Electoral commission confirms landslide victory for law professor over rival Nabil Karoui in presidential runoff vote.

By AL JAZEERA

Independent law professor Kais Saied has won Tunisia's presidential election with 72.71 percent of votes, the country's electoral commission has confirmed.

Saied secured 2.7 million votes against one million received by his opponent, Nabil Karoui, in Sunday's runoff vote, the commission said on Tuesday.

Karoui, a business tycoon who was in jail for most of the campaign, conceded defeat earlier on Monday.

The electoral commission said turnout stood at 55 percent.

Saied, 61, is an independent candidate with no political experience. He has pledged to fight corruption and support decentralisation.

NTVUganda has added Annual machine exhibition to target agricultural value chain video

Annual machine exhibition to target agricultural value chain



In the bid to proactively promote agricultural mechanisation, an outfit called Promote Uganda has organised the first agricultural value chain machinery exhibition with sights on technology transfer from China this year. The organisers say well designed financing models for small holder farmers could ease issues of affordability. #NTVNews Subscribe to Our Channel For more news visit http://www.ntv.co.ug Follow us on Twitter http://www.twitter.com/ntvuganda Like our Facebook page https://ift.tt/1bbEIWm