Friday, July 29, 2016

ON PUBLIC SPEAKING - #Uganda #Education #PublicSpeak


When our family lived in Toronto, we had a run in with an amazing school.  I had only done my high school in British Columbia (www.pearsoncollege.ca) and prior to that I was at at St.  Mary's Namagunga (http://brainshare.ug/namagunga) in Uganda.

I do not say that Uganda has to teach public speaking but I have seen it in the eyes of a kid.

When Rebecca was 3yrs old, she got on the bus and went to school.  St. Elizabeth Seton in Toronto.  The province of Ontario allows kids to join in the year they turn 4yrs of age.  She is an end of year kid.

So in Junior Kindergarten she had to do a public presentation in front of the other little kids.

The way it is done in Canada is usually every kid brings in their toy and talks about their toy.  

For her show off day, she took Asterix and Obelix. And she proceeded to read like only a good teacher could understand.  Mrs. Colaço then asked her to explain what kind of words she was saying.  Suddenly the woman was faced with a kid who could speak Latin or some archaic language and Mrs Colaço knew her students well and knew that book.  She was just a bit surprised that a barely 4yr old could read it in a strange language and even explain it in English.

Rebecca was dyslexic (same with Natasha).  Kids who are dsylexic write horribly and you should have seen them take down the phone number and message of who called.  The numbers were always reversed.

Mrs. Colaço told me that Rebecca would get over dyslexia by age P3.  She had moved from Guyana to Canada to teach and had been teaching kids with troubled learning.  She was so damn good because she taught each kid at the kid's level.   Had she been teaching in Uganda, she would never have paid attention to a kid who is now in Health Sciences in Canada's best University and heading to Medical school.  She would also not have known that when Natasha came along and was reversing things that her advice was in time.

Dyxlexic kids are usually very brilliant but their brains work too fast and they cannot stand the slow learning pace and many of them end up diagnosed with ADH or ADHD (attention defficieny).  Thesee kids usually need a very stimulative learning environment or a lot of sports.  9 is 6 to them.  Just think about it.

Martha Leah Nangalama
Moncton, Canada
I am passionate about education.

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