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Friday, February 20, 2015

NEVER ABUSE A STRANGER - YOU MIGHT LIVE TO REGRET IT

This article was shared on my Face Book Timeline by one brother from Uganda Opolot Emmanuel Gifty

The interesting thing is I write much about #Ugandans not abusing total strangers but it turns out that other people in the rest of the world also abuse total strangers.  Why do people do this?  Please read the full article and then you will know why you must not attack total strangers on FaceBook or abuse strangers anywhere at all.  It could ruin your chances for a good future.

http://nangalama.blogspot.ca/2015/02/never-abuse-stranger-you-might-live-to.html
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Why you should never swear at strangers on the train

A commuter who was told by fellow passenger to 'go f*** yourself' on a busy rush hour train met him again...to interview him for a job

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Commuters on London Underground
An unfortunate commuter told his interviewer to “go f*** yourself” as they both got off a train during rush hour Photo: Alamy
A commuter who launched a foul-mouthed tirade at a fellow passenger he bumped into on a crowded train faced him again just hours later – at a job interview.
The man told his future interviewer to “go f*** yourself” as they both got off a train at Monument station during rush hour on Monday morning.
Later that day, they were reunited but in a much more formal setting, with HR executive Matt Buckland interviewing the angry commuter he had met on the District line that morning.
"At Monument station, I stood to one side to let someone else off the train first and I think he thought I was just standing in his way,” Mr Buckland, head of recruitment for investment firm Forward Partners, toldBuzzFeed.
"He pushed and I turned, I explained I was getting off too but he pushed past and then looked back and suggested I might like to f*** myself."
During the interview, Mr Buckland said that the job seeker did not recognise him, but a few questions about how his journey to work had been that morning jolted his memory.
“I asked him how he got to the interview, how was his morning commute," he said. "We were on the train in the morning but the interview was at 5.30pm that evening.”
Mr Buckland explained that the man, who had applied for a web development role at his company, was not offered the job, adding that this was nothing to do with the incident that morning.
“It would be easy to hold something like this over someone in an interview, but for me interviews aren’t about that," he said.
"When you interview you are looking for a read of skills but also to know if that person is a real human being, it’s about that connection.
"By the end of the interview we laughed it off and were both happy.”
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Martha Leah Zesaguli (Nangalama)
Moncton, Canada
Born and Raised in Uganda (Bududa District) and IT professional with Social Media experience. 

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